Condominium

John D. MacDonald


Condominium

Condominium

  • Title: Condominium
  • Author: John D. MacDonald
  • ISBN: 9780449207376
  • Page: 197
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback



Welcome to Golden Sands, the dream condominium built on a weak foundation and a thousand dirty secrets.Here is a panoramic look at the shocking facts of life in a Sun Belt community the real estate swindles and political payoffs, the maintenance charges that run up and the health benefits that run out the crackups and marital breakdowns the disaster that awaWelcome to Golden Sands, the dream condominium built on a weak foundation and a thousand dirty secrets.Here is a panoramic look at the shocking facts of life in a Sun Belt community the real estate swindles and political payoffs, the maintenance charges that run up and the health benefits that run out the crackups and marital breakdowns the disaster that awaits those who play in the path of the hurricane First rate entertainment New York Daily News.


Recent Comments "Condominium"

★ ★ ★ ★ 1/2Sometimes plans go awry for the better. In a quick one-line comment on John D. MacDonald’s Murder in the Wind, I compared it to this novel. The conversation that followed led me to write a more detailed summary of Condominium, and upon reflection I felt it summed up my opinion well enough that I could re-purpose it as review. The plan? Dig out the book the first chance I got and fact check my memory. Where the plan went wrong? I ended up reading the whole damn thing. 478 pag [...]

I can remember the opening shot of Barbara Eden (playing Barbara Messenger) floating in the middle of the vast ocean (in a row boat?) of the made for TV movie Condominium (1980). So when I saw a copy of John D. MacDonald's novel of the same name, I had to read it.Condominium was a departure for MacDonald, who is best known for his Travis McGee series. The book opens with a dedication: "This book is dedicated to these people who were part of the good years in Sarasota and were washed away:"and co [...]

Could have used a lot of trimming, despite that it's still damn brilliant.

WOW. I've read a lot of John D. MacDonald's thrillers over the years, including all of his Travis McGee series, but this one is his masterpiece. Everyone in Florida should read this at least once. The book -- about the lives and loves of the denizens of one condominium on a Southwest Florida island -- takes a long time to build a picture of how corrupt politicians, shady bankers, corner-cutting construction crews, greedy real estate salespeople and crooked developers set the stage for disaster, [...]

I had to slog through some of the schemey real estate intrigue bits, but the characterization is decent (despite not always having the most likable of characters) and the book became hard to put down around the point you realize the hurricane is going to be a big one. Not exactly the most uplifting read, and it will give you second thoughts about buying property on the coast.

I can remember the opening shot of Barbara Eden (playing Barbara Messenger) floating in the middle of the vast ocean (in a row boat?) of the made for TV movie Condominium (1980). So when I saw a copy of John D. MacDonald's novel of the same name, I had to read it.Condominium was a departure for MacDonald, who is best known for his Travis McGee series. The book opens with a dedication: "This book is dedicated to these people who were part of the good years in Sarasota and were washed away:"and co [...]

The beginning was a slog, but as the storm was born and strengthened, so did the pace of the book until I was lifted almost out of my chair by waves of description. It's probably not the best book to read when you already live within 10 miles of the Atlantic and are attempting to move closer still the the southeastern Florida coast. I'm happy that i read it outside fo hurricane season, but I know for certain that certain images will stay with me come August.

Good read, a bit confusing and with the massive number of characters in the book. By the time you hit the middle of the book, your sure that Marty Liss is the bad guy, but pretty much the only one I found myself rooting for. Thank goodness for Gus and Sam, all the sudden the story picks up it's foreshadowing and boom. On a side note, reading this fictional tale reminded me of seeing and reading "The Big Short". WOuld love to see this as a movie, but someone would f it up.

JDM got more expansive as he got older, and this is a book, multilayered book set in one of the new condominium complexes in S. Florida in the 1980s. It didn't have Travis McGee but it was classic John D. Macdonald.

Update: September 9, 2017 Wonder what John D MacDonald would say about hurricane Irma in Florida at the end of the week?Michael Lewis organizational dynamics in fiction form written in 1977. Impressive. John D MacDonald's books are a zoology manual for different types and varieties of American men 73 He vowed to take it very slowly with Henry, to bring him along step by step until at last he was clear-eyed:conscious of the reasons for the porn manuals in the best bookstores, for the weakening of [...]

McDonald's novel Condominium was written in the late 70's so most of the residents are from the World War II generation, and have had some success in life, but are still filled with angst about the threat of losing all their investments: Most of their wealth is in their condominium. Condominium life in Florida in the 70s, was a bizarre scene, where the newly minted geezers were stored in giant concrete chests of drawers, with little balconies, that (in the good one's) overlooked the water. The n [...]

If you look just past your peripheral vision while you’re reading this, you can almost see someone changing the television dial (by hand) from a Dan Rather report on Jimmy Carter to a new episode of The Rockford Files. That’s largely a compliment; this is one of those books that seems really to capture its moment. It virtually smells of the mid-1970s.In other words, this is analogue fiction. You can hear the pops on the LP as the needle works the grooves, and you can see the deep professiona [...]

I picked this book up about 6 years ago when someone recommended it having liked a few of Arthur Hailey's works. Recently I've read all the Travis McGee series by McDonald and when I noticed Condominium was also by him I figured now would be a good time to actually read it.I'm glad I did, whilst the vast array of characters initially seems a bit overwhelming once you're into the story things fall into place and I found it wasn't difficult to picture each of the characters in their settings.It's [...]

Condominium appeared on a booklist of influential Florida themed books, so I decided to give it a read. Perhaps I should have thought twice about reading a 447 page book about Florida condo dwellers in the lead up to a giant hurricane. This was not an uplifting book. It tackles the issues of corporate greed, unfulfilled retirement living, and the effects of natural disasters. I liked gaining a fresh perspective on topics I have not given much thought to before (such as why a lot of retired peopl [...]

I began reading this, coincidentally, at about the same time as hurricane Matthew was beginning to strengthen. Condominium is about shady political deals, substandard building and shaky finances that go into the growth of the Florida keys. It also is about the people who decide to make Florida their retirement home and the effect a huge hurricane has on all their lives. Although it was written in 1977 it is surprisingly up to date. This is a re-read for me. I read it when it first came out almos [...]

This book had a lot of potential with its plot lines and the writing was done well. However, there were entirely too many characters. I literally started taking notes on who was who, but gave up after I filled 2 sheets of paper. When the hurricane finally hits about 90% into the book and you learn the fate of the various characters, you really don't care because you can't remember who this person was in the story line. The hurricane should have come earlier in the book so that there could be mor [...]

The Travis McGee books were favorite summer beach reads before I discovered Carl Hiaasen. I read Condominium right after I had pulled a term as President of out homeowners' association. The description of the contentious annual meeting rand really true for me. I had also dealt with a developer whose practices barely met code. The most memorable scene was the martini olive on the fireplace mantle at a hurricane party. It was a fun read with sleazy villains.

This is really a disaster thriller about a hurricane hitting a Florida Key and what would happen to some of those cheaply designed condos if the perfect storm came at the wrong time. High August tides, too much clearing of trees and structural deficiencies combine to topple the hideous behemoth. Good riddance I say. Capably written by MacDonald with lots of detailed description of constuction and scheming bankers and real estate developers.

This novel probably has John D. MacDonald's most complex plot, and certainly has the largest cast of significant characters. It's a difficult read, is not his usual "genre fiction", and thus won't please every Travis McGee fan out there. Nonetheless it probably inspired Carl Hiaasen's many fine satires of Florida commerce and government, and is one of MacDonald's finest works. Of the non-Travis McGee books I would only rate "One More Sunday" ahead of it.

MacDonald cashed in bigtime on the 70s disaster craze with this 1977 novel about a big condominium project, shoddily built by corrupt developers, that falls apart during a hurricane. Think The Towering Inferno, The Poseidon Adventure, Earthquake, etc. In those days of the Watergate scandal, there was a widespread feeling that everything was falling apart. This is a big novel with a large cast of characters, and it's an above-average example of the genre, from a master.

Direct frontal assault on the rape of the South Florida coast by hotel/condo/resort developers. MacDonald harbored a romantic attachment to the Florida coast cira 1940-1960 and wishes it were still so. Although, usually a part of his Travis Magee series, this really lets us know how he feels. The only subplot is how the coast extracts revenge.

This book was written in my home town Sarasota Fl, shortly after the first massive condo was built on Siesta Key. We all hated the Condo, and hoped it had the same fate as this book. Reading John MacDonald's books are like returning to my childhood -

This is the third time I have read this book. It is one of the best on Florida ever. It should be read by every Floridian.cially those who were born and lived elsewhere before they came to Florida to live.

Author MacDonald assembles a thoroughly wretched group of retirees and real estate swindlers, then concocts really gruesome ways for them to die. Considering the novel's Florida sun belt locale and hurricane climax, I wouldn't recommend this for beach reading.

Florida, distilled in 478 pages.Third time reading this; it never gets old. MacDonald nails the state's populations, shifting/shiftless as its sandy islands.

A cut above the average disaster novel, thanks to MacDonaLd's anger and his feel for Florida.[return][return]kenficara/books/2007/05/co

John D. MacDonald books have never been my cup of tea, but I do seem to pick one up each summer for a few days in Florida. The fast pace and the setting (60s South Florida, usually) make for easy beach reading.I had higher expectations than usual for this one because 1. it isn't part of a mystery series 2. it was published relatively late in his career (1977)3. it covers topics that seem to be right in MacDonald's wheelhouse: namely corrupt politicians and real estate developers.All told, howeve [...]

This book was not at all what I expected. John D. MacDonald is the kind of writer that other writers refer to in their books, which made me very interested. But I thought his books were all mysteries. Not this one. It is about the real estate/condo building trade on the Florida Gulf coast. Fascinating. All the ins and outs and interrelationships of developers, real estate sales, management, politicians, etc. And what can happen if it goes wrong. Obviously meticulously researched (engineering, we [...]

Overly long and the second-string characters tend to blend into a forgettable mulch, but classic MacDonald prose throughout with the last 20% (yes, I read the Kindle version) painting a vivid picture of being caught inside a hurricane.

The saddest part of this book for me was the realization that my tastes have really changed since 40 years ago when I first discovered MacDonald. The writing drew me in and I love Travis McGee. During the next 25 years of tracking down the 77 novels and other work he did, I presented him as my favorite author. i must back down from that now. 'Condominium' is a triumph for any author to accomplish. Just not a triumph i care for.Part of my trouble is the fatalist view throughout the entire book an [...]


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    Published :2018-09-17T05:02:11+00:00