Body Horror: Capitalism, Fear, Misogyny, Jokes

Anne Elizabeth Moore


Body Horror: Capitalism, Fear, Misogyny, Jokes

Body Horror: Capitalism, Fear, Misogyny, Jokes

  • Title: Body Horror: Capitalism, Fear, Misogyny, Jokes
  • Author: Anne Elizabeth Moore
  • ISBN: 9781940430881
  • Page: 344
  • Format: Paperback



Unspeakable acts are committed on women s bodies under capitalism everyday In Body Horror, Anne Elizabeth Moore explores the global toll of capitalism on women with thorough research, surprising humor, and ease especially when examining her own experiences with disease and health care to create a portrait of contemporary American culture that is gory and fascinating.AnneUnspeakable acts are committed on women s bodies under capitalism everyday In Body Horror, Anne Elizabeth Moore explores the global toll of capitalism on women with thorough research, surprising humor, and ease especially when examining her own experiences with disease and health care to create a portrait of contemporary American culture that is gory and fascinating.Anne Elizabeth Moore is the author of Unmarketable and Cambodian Grrrl, co editor and publisher of the now defunct Punk Planet, a founding editor of Best American Comics, a Fulbright scholar, former UN Press Fellow, and USC Annenberg Getty Arts Journalism Fellow.


Recent Comments "Body Horror: Capitalism, Fear, Misogyny, Jokes"

A series of essays that pays an homage to a genre of horror films and novels (body horror) by using them as a springboard to discuss the horrors women face under a patriarchal capitalism (particularly in work, entertainment, and medicine). The author outlines some of these horrors as a close observer (Massacre on Veng Street) or as a quasi survivor (Fucking Cancer). Her writing style does take some getting used to, but the patient reader is rewarded with trenchant observations. Metaphysics of Co [...]

Read my review of this here! autostraddle/body-hor

Maybe I missed something; maybe I just didn't "get" this book. It wasn't what I expected, which would have been fine, were it not for the convoluted writing style and the fact that I honestly found it very boring. Often I found myself wondering what many of the long, rambling, self-referential passages had to do with anything at all. There WERE some valuable points and critiques in here with regards to capitalism and feminism, but a lot of it read like it had been written by an angry teenager ta [...]

I was really excited about this book, but it fell far short of my expectations. Moore draws on many primary texts, events, experiences, little known facts, and phenomena that are interesting - or seem to be, from her relatively limited treatment of them - but her writing is so frenetic, jumping from topic to topic within a given essay it is sometimes difficult to see the connection from one part of the essay to the next, or how parts of the discussion serve her overall point; or if she is even t [...]

I was ALL ABOUT this book until the line about queerness. She says she identifies as queer, but not in the bisexual way in which young women kiss girls to get attention from boys. This biphobic line completely ignores the history of the word "queer" and invalidates the point she's trying to make about the reclamation of the word "crip."

I really really wanted to like this book. I relate (or thought I related) to a lot of the things Moore writes about, but I’m ultimately left feeling a bit. I don’t know, frustrated I guess. There was one essay that I found particularly grating. For all of Moore’s claiming to be “neither stupid or ignorant of political struggles,” I found much of her writing tone deaf, such as when she notes (on the page opposite of the one with the previous quote) that she uses the word “queer” as [...]

Eclectic range of essays involving the theme of real-life body horror, re. the treatment of women's bodies by the patriarchal/capitalist medical establishment, workplace, and film industries, all informed by a queer crip perspective. Moore is a smart, funny, and insightful writer on the sentence level, but the emotional aesthetic logic of her transitions--between sentences, paragraphs, and sections--sometimes loses me and/or the intentional direction of the piece. Despite all the structural wave [...]

Although some pretty weighty topics are discussed in this book, it isn't the best feminist text I've read. I don't really know what I was expecting when I came across this book. Moore discusses some fairly weighty topics here and she's obviously well read on them. She speaks quite a bit about her autoimmune diseases, yet we never really learn what they are. I do respect privacy, however, it may have informed me a little more on what she deals with on a day to day basis so I could better understa [...]

I'm still thinking about these essays. While sometimes Anne Elizabeth Moore comes across as a feminist conspiracy theorist, other times she is touching raw nerves about illness, capitalism, time, femininity, the body, horror, medical instituions, Cambodia, and life itself with such powerful and honest words its hard to critique her style at all. Also, the illustrations throughout are glorious and bizarre. The last essay about death and humor wrenched me to the core, I almost cried.

I came into this book with the wrong expectations, as I didn't realize how wide-ranging the essay topics would be. The author's unique perspective is fascinating and insightful, and I loved the illustrations by Xander Marro. I find it very interesting how much the author has thought about (auto)immunity, but found some of the interpretations of the immune system to be surprisingly skewed, if not off-base. Some of this was fairly minor - for example, talking about "lymphocytes, which develop into [...]

this is a very good collection of essays,some of them very brutal and frank,about health issues,including autoimmune diseases,as well as how being a woman affects one's health care under our USAian brand of capitalism. that is where a lot of the horror lies.i really enjoyed her writing and thoughts,and i hope someone will write a more eloquent review for this book on . i am going to be seeking to read more of her writinge cover illustration as well as those inside the book are pretty awful,not a [...]

On board for some essays more than others, though I appreciate their feminist approach (replete with feminist-queer-etc vocabulary!) to tackling their subject matter. Probably the most significant body of work I've encountered with great focus on autoimmune diseases; the following figures especially caught my eye: 1 in 12 people (or, 1 in 9 women) will develop autoimmunity [issues] over the course of their lives, while 1 in 14 people will develop cancer. Cancer research gets 7.5 times the fundin [...]

What a great collection of essays. The topics meander all over the place (international, national, personal) but the logic makes sense. Interesting stuff about the genre of horror and what is considered horrific/who decides what is horrific. Lots of really interesting commentary on health in America and women's health. Even more interesting things about femininity and how it's consistently undervalued.

This book was definitely not what I expected from the title but maybe that's a good thing. As a collection of essays, some pieces are more interesting than others but she certainly got me thinking about new sides to things I didn't think I'd be interested in.Not sure where / what the jokes are.

Loved this. Articles I would read but would have otherwise never come across I breezed through and learned from. So excited to meet her next week.

A really thought provoking and touching collection. I especially admired the way she was able to weave unlikely subjects together. Recommended.


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    Published :2018-06-20T22:54:58+00:00