Price's Lost Campaign: The 1864 Invasion of Missouri

Mark A. Lause


Price's Lost Campaign: The 1864 Invasion of Missouri

Price's Lost Campaign: The 1864 Invasion of Missouri

  • Title: Price's Lost Campaign: The 1864 Invasion of Missouri
  • Author: Mark A. Lause
  • ISBN: 9780826219497
  • Page: 425
  • Format: Hardcover

Sterling Price Sterling Old Pap Price September , September , was an American lawyer, planter, soldier, and politician from the U.S state of Missouri, who served as the th Governor of the state from to He also served as a United States Army Lost Cause of the Confederacy The Lost Cause of the Confederacy, or simply the Lost Cause, is an American historical negationist ideology that holds that, despite losing the American Civil War, the cause of the Confederacy was a just and heroic one The ideology endorses the supposed virtues of the antebellum South, viewing the war as a struggle primarily for the Southern way of life or states rights in the face of Republican Karen Handel defeats Democrat Jon Ossoff in BROOKHAVEN, Ga President Trump s hopes of steadying his presidency and his agenda on Capitol Hill were given a lift Tuesday when a Republican won a special congressional election in the How the Left Lost Its Mind The Atlantic Polemicists, conspiracists, and outright fabulists are feeding an alternative media landscape where the implausibility of a claim is no bar to its acceptance. HHS Secretary Tom Price resigns amid criticism for taking Tom Price, President Trump s embattled health and human services secretary, resigned Friday amid sharp criticism of his extensive use of taxpayer funded charter flights, the White House said. Who is Steve Bannon, what s the former White House chief News Corp is a network of leading companies in the worlds of diversified media, news, education, and information services.



In the fall of 1864, during the last brutal months of the Civil War, the Confederates made one final, desperate attempt to rampage through the Shenandoah Valley, Tennessee, and Missouri Price s Raid was the common name for the Missouri campaign led by General Sterling Price Involving tens of thousands of armed men, the 1864 Missouri campaign has too long remained unexam In the fall of 1864, during the last brutal months of the Civil War, the Confederates made one final, desperate attempt to rampage through the Shenandoah Valley, Tennessee, and Missouri Price s Raid was the common name for the Missouri campaign led by General Sterling Price Involving tens of thousands of armed men, the 1864 Missouri campaign has too long remained unexamined by a book length modern study, but now, Civil War scholar Mark A Lause fills this long standing gap in the literature, providing keen insights on the problems encountered during and the myths propagated about this campaign Price marched Confederate troops 1,500 miles into Missouri, five times as far as his Union counterparts who met him in the incursion Along the way, he picked up additional troops the most exaggerated estimates place Price s troop numbers at 15,000 The Federal forces initially underestimated the numbers heading for Missouri and then called in troops from Illinois and Kansas, amassing 65,000 to 75,000 troops and militia members The Union tried to downplay its underestimation of the Confederate buildup of troops by supplanting the term campaign with the impromptu raid This term was also used by Confederates to minimize their lack of military success The Confederates, believing that Missourians wanted liberation from Union forces, had planned a two phase campaign They intended not only to disrupt the functioning government through seizure of St Louis and the capital, Jefferson City, but also to restore the pro secessionist government driven from the state three years before The primary objective, however, was to change the outcome of the Federal elections that fall, encouraging votes against the Republicans who incorporated ending slavery into the Union war goals What followed was widespread uncontrolled brutality in the form of guerrilla warfare, which drove support for the Federalists Missouri joined Kansas in reelecting the Republicans and ensuring the end of slavery Lause s account of the Missouri campaign of 1864 brings new understanding of the two distinct phases of the campaign, as based upon declared strategic goals Additionally, as the author reveals the clear connection between the military campaign and the outcome of the election, he successfully tests the efforts of new military historians to integrate political, economic, social, and cultural history into the study of warfare In showing how both sides during Price s Raid used self serving fictions to provide a rationale for their politically motivated brutality and were unwilling to risk defeat, Lause reveals the underlying nature of the American Civil War as a modern war.


Recent Comments "Price's Lost Campaign: The 1864 Invasion of Missouri"

A concise study of one of the major Trans-Mississippi campaigns of the war. The book was hard to follow due to the many typos in the text. If the author were to revise the text, it would rank as an essential campaign study. Overall an ok read with much room for improvement.

Not the best Civil War book I've read. It has only two maps but I found both to be worthless in trying to follow the movement of troops in the text. (I actually used a State Farm road atlas to locate towns.) Maps for each battle described in the book would have been nice. I'm not sure if I simply missed it but it didn't look like Mr. Lause gave any reason for why the Confederates abandoned their attempt to take Jefferson City.After Jefferson City, Mr. Lause describes the remainder of the campaig [...]


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    Posted by:Mark A. Lause
    Published :2018-09-11T20:07:18+00:00